Latest Irma Update from the National Hurricane Center

Last updated 9/10/17 @ 11:00 a.m.

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19/9/17 @ 8:15 p.m.

Heavy squalls with embedded tornadoes are sweeping across South Florida. Extremely dangerous Hurricane Irma is centered about 110 miles (175 km) southeast of Key West. Radar loops indicate that Irma has temporarily slowed down, but the hurricane has been moving toward the west-northwest near 7 mph (11 km/h) since earlier today. A northwest motion is expected to begin tonight with a turn toward the north-northwest on Sunday. On the forecast track, the core of Irma will continue to move near the north coast of Cuba during the next few hours, and should be near the Florida Keys Sunday morning. The hurricane is expected to move along or near the southwest coast of Florida Sunday afternoon. A NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft has found that Irma’s intensity is a little lower, and the maximum sustained winds are estimated to be near 120 mph (195 km/h) with higher gusts. Irma is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Irma is forecast to restrengthen once it moves away from Cuba and remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida.¬†Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center, and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 195 miles (315 km). Marathon International Airport recently reported a sustained wind of 48 mph (77 km/h) and a gust to 67 mph (108 km/h). The minimum central pressure based on aircraft data is 932 mb (27.52 inches).¬†A Storm Surge Warning is in effect from the Volusia/Brevard County line southward around the Florida peninsula to the Suwanee River, including the Florida Keys and Tampa Bay.

9/9/17 @ 11:00 a.m.

Irma continues to pound the north coast of Cuba and is forecast to restrengthen while heading for south Florida and the keys according to NOAA NWS National Hurricane Center. As of 11 a.m. EDT the storm is centered about 175 miles southeast of Key West, Florida, moving toward the west along the north coast of Cuba at near 9 mph. A northwest motion is expected to begin later today with a turn toward the north-northwest on Sunday. On the forecast track, the core of Irma will continue to move near or over the north coast of Cuba later today, nd will reach the Florida Keys Sunday morning. The hurricane is expected to move along or near the southwest coast of Florida Sunday afternoon.

Maximum sustained winds are near 125 mph (205 km/h) with higher gusts. Irma is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Irma is forecast to restrengthen once it moves away from Cuba, and Irma is expected to remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 195 miles (315 km). Caibarien, Cuba recently reported a wind gust to 124 mph (200 km/h). The minimum central pressure reported by an Air Force plane was 941 mb (27.79 inches).

A Storm Surge Warning is in effect from the Volusia/Brevard County line southward around the Florida peninsula to the Suwanee River, including the Florida Keys and Tampa Bay.

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9/9/17 @ 8:30 a.m.

3Tropical storm-force winds and Irma’s outer rain bands have begun to batter Florida’s southern tip. The terrain of Cuba has weakened the hurricane but restrengthening is anticipated. Maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 130 mph (215 km/h) with higher gusts, but Irma remains a category 4 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale. Irma is forecast to restrengthen once it moves away from Cuba, and Irma is expected to remain a powerful hurricane as it approaches Florida. A Storm Surge Warning is in effect from the Volusia/Brevard County Line southward around the Florida peninsula to Chassahowitzka, including the Florida Keys and Tampa Bay. A Storm Surge Watch is in effect from north of the Volusia/Brevard County Line to the Flagler/Volusia County line and north of Chassahowitzka to the Suwannee River.

A Storm Surge Warning means there is a danger of life-threatening inundation, from rising water moving inland from the coastline, during the next 36 hours in the indicated locations. The water is expected to reach the following heights ABOVE GROUND if the peak surge occurs at the time of high tide:

  • 3 to 5 ft Suwannee River to Venice including Tampa Bay
  • 8 to 12 ft SW Florida from Captiva to Cape Sable
  • 5 to 10 ft Cape Sable to Boca Raton including the Florida Keys
  • 5 to 8 ft Venice to Captiva
  • 2 to 4 ft Boca Raton to Flagler/Volusia County line

This is a life-threatening situation! Persons located within these areas should take all necessary actions to protect life and property from rising water and the potential for other dangerous conditions. Promptly follow evacuation and other instructions from local officials.

As of 8 a.m. EDT Irma is centered about 225 miles south of Miami, moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 km/h), along the north coast of Cuba. A northwest motion is expected to begin later today with a turn toward the north-northwest tonight or on Sunday. On the forecast track, the core of Irma will continue to move near or over the north coast of Cuba this morning, and will reach the Florida Keys Sunday morning. Hurricane-force winds extend outward up to 70 miles (110 km) from the center and tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 195 miles (315 km). The minimum central pressure reported by a reconnaissance plane was 937 mb (27.67 inches).

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